Chris Gates

Chris Gates is a thought leader in the fields of democratic theory and practice and political and civic engagement. For the past three decades he has been a leading voice for strengthening democratic processes and structures and developing new approaches to both engagement and decision-making. Gates has been mentored by innovative leaders like John Gardner, Henry Cisneros, Bill Bradley and Terry Sanford, and shares their desire to build a nation of engaged, informed and empowered citizens.

Gates serves as the Executive Director of PACE, Philanthropy for Active Civic Engagement. PACE, based in Washington, DC, is an affinity group of the Council on Foundations and serves as a learning collaborative of American foundations that fund work in the fields of civic engagement, service and democratic practice. In this role Gates works within the philanthropic and non-profit communities with those organizations who work to strengthen America's democratic practice, with a particular emphasis on the role that information and social media can play in empowering citizens to become more engaged. Gates also speaks and teaches around the country on the topics of civic engagement and democratic theory and practice.

Posts by Chris Gates

  • Foundations Must Rethink Their Ideas of Strategic Giving and Accountability (07.03.14 )

    By Chris Gates, Executive Director, Philanthropy for Active Civil Engagement, and Brad Rourke, Program Officer, Charles F. Kettering Foundation People used to defer to experts who knew things that “we” didn’t. But now, with the swipe of a finger or a keystroke, anybody can become instantly informed about nearly any topic. Citizens everywhere have demanded […]

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